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Nuclear Policy

Forum on Physics and Society of the American Physical Society

Articles appearing in Physics & Society

Bombs, Reprocessing, and Reactor-Grade Plutonium (April 2006)
Coauthor: George S. Stanford (PDF)

Nuclear Power and Proliferation (January 2006)
Coauthor: George S. Stanford (PDF)

Purex and Pyro are not the Same (July 2004)
Coauthors: William H. Hannum and George S. Stanford (PDF)

Gaps in the APS Position on Nuclear Energy (April 2002)
Coauthor: George S. Stanford (PDF)

Nuclear Policy
Physics
Politics

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Smarter Use of Nuclear Waste

Scientific American (December 2005)
Coauthors: William H. Hannum and George S. Stanford

Reprinted in Oil and the Future of Energy by The Editors of Scientific American Magazine (The Lyons Press, 2007), p. 98.
Fast-neutron reactors could extract much more energy from recycled nuclear fuel, minimize the risks of weapons proliferation and markedly reduce the time nuclear waste must be isolated. (PDF)

General Interest
Global Warming
Nuclear Policy

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Can We Count on Missile Defense?

With Craig Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman.

Although the threat to the U.S. should not be ignored, it does not justify the rush to deployment of national missile defense systems.

USA Today Magazine (September 2001)  PDF.

 

General Interest
Nuclear Policy
Politics
USA Today Magazine

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The Phantom Defense: America’s Pursuit of the Star Wars Illusion

Praeger Press 2001

A Project of the Center for International Policy

Coauthors: Craig Eisendrath and Melvin A. Goodman

Like President Reagan with his “Star Wars” program, President Bush has again made national missile defense (NMD) a national priority at a cost which may exceed $150 billion in the next ten years. Defense experts Eisendrath, Goodman, and Marsh contend that recent tests give little confidence that any of the systems under consideration—land-based, boost-phase, or laser-driven—have any chance of effective deployment within decades. The interests of the military-industrial complex and the unilateralist views of the Bush administration are driving NMD, not a desire to promote national security.

Rather than increase U.S. security, the plans of the current administration, if implemented, will erode it. NMD will heighten the threat from China and Russia, alienate key allies, and provoke a new arms race and the proliferation of nuclear weapons, all in response to a greatly exaggerated threat from so-called “rogue states,” such as North Korea and Iran. Thoughtful diplomacy, not a misguided foreign policy based on a hopeless dream of a “Fortress America,” is the real answer to meeting America’s security goals. Designed to stimulate interest and debate among the public and policy-makers, the Phantom Defense provides solid facts and combines scientific, geopolitical, historical, and strategic analysis to critique the delusion of national missile defense, while suggesting a more effective alternative.

(Phantom Defense at Amazon)

Books
General Interest
Nuclear Policy
Politics

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Nuclear Testing and the 1992 Moratorium

Distributed by the Strategy and Policy Division (N51) of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.

This report continues to have relevance in today’s world. Among other issues, it discusses the “robustness” of existing nuclear weapons. There is also an appendix on the seismic verification of underground nuclear explosions.

(PDF)

Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW) Correspondence: Nature 462, 158 (12 November 2009).

(Nature 12Nov09-Warheads)

General Interest
Nuclear Policy

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Non-Soviet Nuclear Threats: The Meaning of Deterrrence in a Global Context

Distributed by the Strategy and Policy Division (N51) of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (December 1992).

This report continues to have relevance in today’s world.

(PDF)

General Interest
Nuclear Policy

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A Simplified Anti-Submarine Warfare Problem Treated as a Steady-State Markov Process

Applied Physics Communications Vol 8, p. 227 (1988)
Coauthor: Robert Piacesi
[A shortened version of this article also appeared in Physics & Society (January 1989)]

Markov processes represent a powerful method for quantifying questions related to the survivability of strategic nuclear forces. This paper gives an elementary introduction to Markow processes and chains followed by a simple anti-submarine warfare example in which the scenario of a surveillance-surge attack is treated as a steady state Markov process.

(MS Word Document)

Nuclear Policy
Physics

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Yields of US and Soviet Nuclear Tests

Physics Today Vol. 40, p. 36 (August 1987) Part 1(PDF) Part 2 (PDF)
Coauthor: Jack Evernden

Failure to account properly for geological and seismological differences between the US and Soviet test sites has led to overestimates of Soviet tests and to incorrect claims of Soviet cheating on the treaty limit of 150 kilotons.

Nuclear Policy
Physics
Politics

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